economic study of Negro farmers as owners, tenants, and croppers
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economic study of Negro farmers as owners, tenants, and croppers by Donald Dewey Scarborough

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Published in [Athens, Ga .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • African Americans -- Employment.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Donald Dewey Scarborough.
SeriesBulletin of the University of Georgia,, vol. 25, no. 2a. Sept. 1924
Classifications
LC ClassificationsE185.5 .G35 no. 7
The Physical Object
Pagination37 p.
Number of Pages37
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL247010M
LC Control Numbere 24000646
OCLC/WorldCa4240226

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Wilkes County tenant house. Names Scarborough, Donald Dewey (Author) Collection. economic study of Negro farmers as owners, tenants, and croppers, by Donald Dewey Scarborough. Dates / Origin Date Issued: Place: [Athens, Ga.] Library locations Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Jean Blackwell Hutson Research and Reference Division. tenant farmers. Sharecroppers and Tenants A sharecropper did not own his own farm; nor did he own house, mule, or tools. Instead, he rented these from his landlord. The landlord allowed ‘croppers’ to farm his land, usually about 10 acres, in exchange for 1/3 of the crop. For use of a mule, the seeds, and the tools, the cropper frequently paidFile Size: KB. Reynolds () provided data on white and nonwhite operators, full-and part-owners and managers, as well as tenants and croppers from to in the southern states. Also provided are. At the turn of the twentieth century, most of the black farmers did not own the land on which they farmed. Hence in , around 75% of the black farm operators were tenant farmers and sharecroppers. In comparison, about 30% of white farm operators were tenant farmers and share croppers. Most of the black farmers also lived in the South.

gro tenants are given smaller acre- age, lower value in buildings and implements, and charged higher cash rent proportionately than whites. At the end of seven decades, the freed Negro farmers, in spite of thrift and industry, find only per cent of their number, in contrast to . 4 Land owners exploited their tenants. African American farmer were at the mercy of the land owners. Land owners usually controlled the sale of the tenants’ harvests and therefore undercut and defrauded the farmer. In addition, sharecroppers and tenant farmer were perpetually indebted to property owners because they “borrowed” for seed and other purchases. One Raj Kumar Shukla from Champaran, on the annual meeting of Indian National Congress, apprised Gandhiji about the appalling condition of share-croppers there. Gandhiji reached there and came to know that the large estates were owned by the Englishmen and the Indians worked as their tenant farmers and they had to pay 15% of their land. After the investigations by Gandhi and the lawyers into. The annual meeting of Indian National Congress was being held. Raj Kumar Shukla from Champaran apprised Gandhiji of appalling conditions of share-croppers there. Gandhiji reached there. He came to know that the large estates were owned by the Englishmen and the Indians worked as their tenant farmers. They were required to pay 15% of their land yields.

Croppers were assigned a plot of land to work, and in exchange owed the owner a share of the crop at the end of the season, usually one half. The owner provided the tools and farm animals. Farmers who owned their own mule and plow were at a higher stage, and were called tenant farmers: They paid the landowner less, usually only a third of each.   Tenant Farmers Hoeing a Cotton Field Sharecropping and tenant farming were the dominant economic model of Alabama agriculture from the late-nineteenth century through the onset of World War terms refer to forms of agriculture conducted by people who did not own the land they worked. These landless farmers worked the plots of other landowners.   In , U.S. farmers harvested more than 50 million acres of wheat (with an average yield of bushels per acre), and got $ per bushel for the crop. At the peak in , million acres were harvested with a somewhat diminished yield of bushels per acre, but the high price of $ per bushel.   Black agriculture was a powerhouse; per capita there were more black farmers than white farmers. But by the turn of the 21 st century, 90 percent of that land was lost. Some of that can be chalked up to the Great Migration, when southern blacks fled to northern cities to escape the racist violence and systemic oppression of the South.